Reflexology

Reflexology

 

ReflexologyB2014.jpgThe history of Reflexology can be traced back to ancient times. Pictures, written records and artifacts show its presence in ancient Egypt, China, India, Japan and Russia. It was not called "reflexology" until 1917, when Vladimir Bekterev, a Russian neurologist and psychiatrist, coined the phrase. In modern day Russia, Reflexology is a highly valued treatment modality, and only physicians are allowed to practice it. In Denmark and Norway, Reflexology is one of the most used alternative therapies. A national survey from 2005 showed that 21.4% of the Danish population had used Reflexology at some point in life, and 6.1% had used Reflexology within the previous year. Although in the USA no medical proof has been established that Reflexology can cure diseases, it is promoted as an effective adjunct treatment for stress related health conditions and, most notably, foot pain.

 

RFX2.jpgHow does it work?
When pressure is applied to any reflexology/acupressure point on the feet, hands or ears, a message is sent to the brain to release endorphins, our body's natural pain relievers. For centuries, Reflexology has been a profoundly relaxing component of the rich healing traditions from the East. Focus on specific points improves circulation, increases flexibility, reduces inflammation and pain. Much like Acupuncture and Acupressure, Reflexology restores and enhances energy flow to the body's organ systems, creating an overall sense of well-being.

 

 

What should you expect during a Reflexology session?
A Reflexology session will last about one hour. During your first session, we will review your medical history, health complaints and needs, and I will inspect your hands, feet and ears. You remain clothed during the session, laying prone on a massage table. You receive a thorough manual manipulation of your feet (and/or hands and ears). After a session, it’s important to drink a lot of fluids to flush released toxins from the body.